LightBoost HOWTO

First published January 13th, 2013

Instructions for Zero Motion Blur on LightBoost LCD

Supported Monitors: ASUS: VG248QE, ASUS VG278H, ASUS VG278HE,
BENQ XL2411T, BENQ XL2420T (Euro), BENQ XL2420TE (US/CAN), BENQ XL2720T
For “LightBoost” on Samsung 120Hz Monitors — see Samsung HOWTO
For “LightBoost” on G-SYNC Monitors (ULMB) — see Ultra Low Motion Blur
For “LightBoost” on 
BENQ Z-Series Monitors (Blur Reduction) — see Strobe Utility

LightBoost monitors have a strobe backlight feature that completely eliminate motion blur for 2D; for CRT-quality perfectly sharp fast motion on LCD.

Without LightBoost
Fast Motion Without LightBoost
With LightBoost
Fast Motion With LightBoost
These are real photographs. Not simulated.  See Comparision: 60fps vs 120fps vs LightBoost

There are rave reviews of LightBoost (“It’s like a CRT”) and media coverage including TFTCentral, ARS Technica, pcmonitors.info, NewEgg, and many others!
For scientific information on how LightBoost eliminates motion blur, see the LightBoost FAQ and high speed video of LightBoost, simulating a 120Hz CRT via a strobe backlight.

Note: There are new LightBoost clones: “ULMB”, “Turbo240″, “BENQ Blur Reduction”, all with better picture quality in the Official 120Hz Monitors List.

Select preferred LightBoost instructions:

Easy LightBoost via ToastyX Strobelight App

This is the world’s easiest way to use LightBoost to eliminate motion blur.
Easily turn ON/OFF LightBoost via a keypress! No hacks. No registry tweaks.
Does not require 3D Vision drivers.

  1. First, Download ToastyX Strobelight.
    IMPORTANT: You must have a supported 120Hz ASUS or 120Hz BENQ monitor!
    IMPORTANT: LightBoost will not work with NVIDIA Optimus (laptops).
  2. Next, run strobelight-setup to install strobed video modes. Then reboot.
    strobelight-setup    strobelight
    IMPORTANT: To easily turn ON/OFF LightBoost, you must install at least one strobed refresh rate AND at least one non-strobed refresh rate.
  3. Finally, after reboot, run strobelight to initialize LightBoost for the first time.
    NOTE: You can add strobelight.exe to the Startup Folder, so it starts up everytime you starts Windows. 
  4. Test LightBoost using a motion test. View Moving Photo Test at TestUFO.com.
    Turn ON/OFF LightBoost while viewing this motion test to see the big difference.
    Test in Chrome or other 120Hz-friendly web browser (FireFox 24+, Opera 15+).

Useful LightBoost Tips

  • Turning ON/OFF LightBoost via hotkeys
    Control+Alt+Plus — turns ON LightBoost
    Control+Alt+Minus — turns OFF LightBoost
  • Other Ways to Verify that LightBoost is enabled:
    (a) Check monitor OSD menus. The “LightBoost” adjustment should be unlocked.
    (b) Wave a finger in front of a white screen. You should see a stroboscopic effect.
    (c) Use a motion test such as www.testufo.com.
    Turn ON/OFF LightBoost while repeating test, to see the big difference.
  • For better LightBoost colors, adjust your nVidia Control Panel:
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Brightness = 52%
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Contrast = 45%
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Gamma = 0.70
    This compensates for the LightBoost gamma bump (washed out colors).
    NOTE: If you get a purple tint, lower the Contrast setting via monitor’s menu until tint disappears. You can also adjust while viewing the Lagom Contrast Test Pattern.
  • For optimal benefit, run your games at triple-digit frame rates.
    Microstutters become easier to detect if they’re no longer masked by motion blur. To eliminate stutters, run LightBoost at frame rates matching the refresh rate.
    (a) Run at 100fps @ 100Hz, or run at 120fps @ 120Hz.
           …Adjust game details or upgrade your GPU.  Also try FXAA instead of FSAA.
    (b) Experiment with VSYNC ON (may lag) or use “Adaptive VSYNC” (less input lag)
           …These settings makes LightBoost framerate=Hz motion look much smoother, to allow game turning/strafing panning motion as smooth as TestUFO or PixPerAn.
    (c) Use a good 1000Hz gaming mouse.
          …Mouse microstutters can hurt motion clarity. LightBoost benefits from a mouse that can turn left/right as smoothly as keyboard strafing left/right. 
  • For other information, see the LightBoost FAQ.
    If you are unable to turn off LightBoost, simply re-run strobelight-setup.exe and install non-strobed refresh rates. Alternatively, simply unplug your monitor’s power cable for a few seconds to deactivate LightBoost.

Alternate LightBoost HOWTO #2: If Using 3D Emitter Or Glasses Kit

Choose these alternate instructions if you have obtained the NVIDIA 3D Vision Kit, or it’s built into your monitor (e.g. ASUS VG278H).  Works on all versions of Windows that 3D Vision is supported. These instructions allow you to keep LightBoost for both 2D and 3D.

If you prefer an easier method of enabling LightBoost with less input lag and less inconveniences, choose the Easy Strobelight method instead of these instructions below.

The procedure is simply set up stereoscopic 3D normally, launch the game in stereoscopic 3D, and then use Control+T to turn off stereoscopic operation.  At this point, you have LightBoost in 2D and you can play normally with no glasses, and with no motion blur!  No need to wear the 3D glasses if you don’t want to wear them.  The steps are as follows:

  1. Make sure your monitor supports LightBoost (see 120Hz Monitors List)
  2. Get your favorite latest graphics drivers from nVidia (www.geforce.com).
  3. Make sure your glasses emitter is connected.
  4. Go to Control Panel -> Display -> Adjust Resolution.
  5. Verify “Enable Stereoscopic 3D settings for all displays” is enabled. (May be missing on Windows 7, skip this step).
  6. Go to NVIDIA Control Panel (system tray -> nVidia icon), and select “Setup Stereoscopic 3D”.
  7. Click “Test Stereoscopic 3D” and follow the vendor instructions to test it at 120Hz.
  8. Start a video game. The game should be running in stereoscopic 3D.  This makes sure LightBoost is running, since it is automatically enabled during stereoscopic 3D.
  9. Hit Control-T inside the video game to turn off stereoscopic operation. This is an official keypress combination provided by official nVidia graphics drivers.
  10. Now you can play the game with no motion blur, for 120fps @ 120Hz gaming!
    The LightBoost strobe backlight is still enabled, and you don’t need the 3D glasses.
  11. Test motion fluidity with www.testufo.com/photo in Google Chrome or another 120Hz web browser.
  12. To keep LightBoost enabled at all times even at Windows Desktop, install this registry tweak. Download this registry file, and doubleclick on this file.
  13. For other information, See the LightBoost FAQ. (e.g. how to easily enable/disable)

Disadvantages:

  • Unlike the ToastyX methods, you have to hit Control+T every time you launch a game, and 3D is not persistently enabled at the desktop (unless the optional registry tweak is installed).
  • Some users have reported a lower framerate and more input lag with the Control+T method than the Unofficial Hack methods or the Easy ToastyX Strobelight method.
  • Some games may need extra adjustment to work well with this (e.g. raising max_fps in Source engine games, or adjusting the VSYNC setting).
  • You need frame rates matching (or exceeding) Hz for best benefit.  Since LightBoost only works at 100Hz to 120Hz, you need 100fps@100Hz, or 120fps@120Hz.

TIP: Turning Off LightBoost:
To turn off LightBoost, either:
1. Switch to a non-LightBoost refresh rate; OR
2. Simply unplug monitor for a few seconds.
Make sure “Enable Stereoscopic 3D” checkbox in nVidia Control Panel is turned off. 

TIP: Improving Convenience, Stability & Eliminating “Control+T”:
Try the easy ToastyX Strobelight App instead, if you are more interested in motion blur elimination rather than 3D Vision.

Alternate LightBoost HOWTO #3: ToastyX Custom Resolution Utility 

Choose these instructions only if you need more control than the Easy Strobelight Method. If you prefer the easy LightBoost method, choose a different set of LightBoost instructions.

  1. Get ToastyX Custom Resolution Utility (CRU).
    Download this and run CRU.
  2. Upon running ToastyX CRU, it will display a drop-down list.
    It should have an entry for each monitor. If there are more entries (e.g. old monitors no longer in use) and you’re not sure which ones are active, run reset-all.exe and reboot. That should leave you with one entry for each connected monitor.
  3. Use the “Edit…” button at the very top to set the product ID to ACI27F8 for each monitor. This will make the driver think you have a monitor with a built-in emitter.
    This makes it easy to enable LightBoost for 2D. (The model name doesn’t matter)
  4. Use the “Import…” button at the bottom to import this file: lightboost.bin
    This includes the LightBoost modes (100Hz / 110Hz / 120Hz).
    You can remove modes that you don’t need. If you have multiple monitors, use the copy & paste buttons at top to copy the resolutions to the other monitor entries. If you need 144Hz (non-LightBoost), add it using Timings “Reduced” instead of “Auto”
  5. Click OK to save the changes, then reboot.
  6. In NVIDIA Control Panel, open the “Set up stereoscopic 3D” page, then click the “Run Setup Wizard” button. If the button isn’t there, uncheck “Enable stereoscopic 3D” and click the “Apply” button.nvidia_control_panel_3dsetup
  7. In the setup wizard, click the “Next” button, then click “Next” again.
    At this point, it should enable LightBoost.  If don’t have an emitter, the mouse cursor may temporarily become very sluggish and jerky.  If you don’t need to enable 3D (which may add input lag for LightBoost 2D), then you can exit here. Otherwise, continue the wizard as usual.
  8. Quickly verify your LightBoost is enabled.
    (a) Check the motion test at www.testufo.com/photo
    (b) Check monitor’s OSD menus, the “LightBoost” adjustment is unlocked.
    (c) Wave finger in front of a white screen. You should see a stroboscopic effect.
  9. For better LightBoost colors, adjust your nVidia Control Panel:
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Brightness = 52%
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Contrast = 45%
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Gamma = 0.70
    This compensates for the LightBoost gamma bump (washed out colors).
    NOTE: For purple tint, lower the Contrast setting via monitor’s menu until the purple disappears. You can also adjust while viewing the Lagom Contrast Test Pattern.
  10. Make sure you run your game at frame rates matching refresh rates.  Motion clarity is so greatly improved, that microstutters and tearing can become more visible.
    You need framerate matching Hz for maximum LightBoost benefit.
    (a) You must run at 100fps @ 100Hz, or run at 120fps @ 120Hz.
    (b) For best game performance, use VSYNC ON (may lag) or use Adaptive VSYNC (eliminate lag, best for competitive). These settings makes LightBoost framerate=Hz motion look much better, similar to TestUFO or PixPerAn.
    (c) Use a good 1000Hz gaming mouse that can turn left/right as smoothly as keyboard strafing left/right. Mouse microstutters can hurt motion clarity.
  11. Test motion fluidity with www.testufo.com/photo in Google Chrome or another 120Hz web browser.

TIP: Turning Off LightBoost:
To turn off LightBoost, either:
1. Switch to a non-LightBoost refresh rate; OR
2. Simply unplug monitor for a few seconds.
Make sure “Enable Stereoscopic 3D” checkbox in nVidia Control Panel is turned off. 

For Other Tips: See the LightBoost FAQ.

Alternate LightBoost HOWTO #4: Advanced EDID Override Method

This is the hardest and most advanced method. It requires no software and no 3D glasses emitter. It only requires nVidia 3D Vision drivers to be installed. Most users should use the easy LightBoost method instead of the below.

  1. Make sure your monitor supports LightBoost.
  2. Make sure you install the latest 3D Vision drivers from www.geforce.com.
  3. IMPORTANT (monitor-specific): If you’re using a monitor without an emitter (e.g. BENQ monitors, ASUS VG278HE or ASUS VG248QE) you must trick it into thinking it’s an ASUS VG278H (non-HE) by installing the EDID override INF file. (This is so nVidia drivers are able to be tricked into enabling LightBoost in 2D mode, without needing to own a shutter glasses emitter). Download the INF file here:
    LightBoost-Monitor-EDID-override.inf
    Supports Windows Vista, 7 and 8. Windows XP is NOT supported.
  4. Install this INF file via Device Manager, then reboot.
    Detailed instructions: First, right-click this INF file in File Explorer and select “Install”. Next, go to Device Manager and right-click your monitor, select “Update Driver Software”, then “Browser my computer…”, then “Let me pick…”, then disable “Show compatible hardware”, then select “LightBoost EDID Override” from manufacturer ASUS (even if you use BENQ) then reboot.
    IMPORTANT (Windows 8 specific): If you’re installing under Windows 8,
    follow these instructions to disable driver signature enforcement before installing this INF file. The INF file is installed via right-clicking the monitor in Control Panel -> Device Manager, and updating its driver.
  5. Install registry tweak to enable LightBoost in 2D mode without shutter glasses:
    ForceLightBoostWithoutGlasses.reg
  6. Save this as a .reg file, double click on .reg file, add to registry, reboot.
  7. Go to Control Panel -> Display -> Adjust Resolution
  8. Check “Enable Stereoscopic 3D settings for all displays” is enabled (Windows 8 only)
  9. Go to NVIDIA Control Panel (system tray -> nVidia icon)
  10. Select “Set up Stereoscopic 3D” at left bar
  11. Select “Enable Stereoscopic 3D” checkbox
  12. Select “Asus 120Hz LCD” (even if you have a BENQ), and click Apply
    Immediately, you should see a change in display colors. Immediately, you should see a change in display colors.
  13. Quickly verify your LightBoost is enabled.
    (a) Check the motion test at www.testufo.com/photo
    (b) Check monitor’s OSD menus, the “LightBoost” adjustment is unlocked.
    (c) Wave finger in front of a white screen. You should see a stroboscopic effect.
  14. For better LightBoost colors, adjust your nVidia Control Panel:
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Brightness = 52%
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Contrast = 45%
    nVidia Control Panel Desktop Gamma = 0.70
    This compensates for the LightBoost gamma bump (washed out colors).
    NOTE: For purple tint, lower the Contrast setting via monitor’s menu until the purple disappears. You can also adjust while viewing the Lagom Contrast Test Pattern.
  15. Make sure you run your game at frame rates matching refresh rates.  Motion clarity is so greatly improved, that microstutters and tearing can become more visible.
    You need framerate matching Hz for maximum LightBoost benefit.
    (a) You must run at 100fps @ 100Hz, or run at 120fps @ 120Hz.
    (b) For best game performance, use VSYNC ON (may lag) or use Adaptive VSYNC (eliminate lag, best for competitive). These settings makes LightBoost framerate=Hz motion look much better, similar to TestUFO or PixPerAn.
    (c) Use a good 1000Hz gaming mouse that can turn left/right as smoothly as keyboard strafing left/right. Mouse microstutters can hurt motion clarity.
  16. Test motion fluidity with www.testufo.com/photo in Google Chrome or another 120Hz web browser.
  17. IMPORTANT: If certain games stubbornly launch in 3D mode (double image), press Control+T while inside the game, to make it switch back to 2D mode.

Alternate LightBoost HOWTO #5: Monitor Hardware Modification

It is possible to re-flash the monitor’s EDID to have LightBoost persistently enabled.  This is an advanced method primarily useful for triple monitor surround LightBoost with newer GeForce drivers. For instructions, see Hardware LightBoost Modification HOWTO.

 If you are a single-monitor user, this is overkill. See Easy LightBoost HOWTO.

Other Tips

Adjust your LightBoost setting for very sharp-looking fast motion:
Adjust your “LightBoost” OSD setting via monitor menus or via ToastyX Strobelight. This adjusts strobe length. Use any value except “OFF”. Lower values are dimmer but have sharper-looking fast motion. Higher values are brighter but have less clear-looking fast motion. The sharpest fast motion occurs at 10% but is very dim. 100% is bright and is good enough for most people. A good compromise setting is 50% in a darkened room. See PHOTOS: LightBoost 10% vs 50% vs 100% for a comparision of the settings.

Smooth Scrolling In Web Browser
Smooth scroll in web browsers: If you’re using Chrome and web browsing, install Chromium Smooth Scroller to gain the benefits of sharp text scrolling with the mouse wheel. Make sure the steering wheel icon is enabled in your Chrome toolbar.

The Resulting Zero Motion Blur

What happens?

      • All trailing artifacts disappears!  Ghosting, coronas, etc.
      • All motion blur disappears!
      • No motion blur when you play video games, even during fast motion.
      • The zero motion blur effect will also occurs on the Windows desktop (e.g. window dragging, scrolling) if this LightBoost tweak is enabled in the Windows desktop.

How is it possible?

LightBoost is a programmable strobe backlight. The backlight is turned off while waiting for LCD to finish pixel transitions (unseen by human eyes), and the backlight is strobed only on fully-refreshed LCD frames (seen by human eyes). The strobes can be shorter than the panel’s pixel transitions, bypassing the pixel transition speed limit!
This is seen in high speed 1000fps video:

Motion blur is determined by the length of time a refresh is displayed on the screen. In addition to increased Hz, this can be further improved by flicker (black periods between refreshes, like a CRT). See this motion blur comparison:

motion-blur-graph

Some notes

      • IMPORTANT: Optimus (laptops) is NOT supported.
      • Minor Side Effects: Different color, dimmer screen brightness, some flicker feel (if sensitive to CRT flicker). The LightBoost FAQ has picture adjustment tips.
      • LightBoost is hardware-limited to refresh rates between 100Hz and 120Hz.
        For 144 Hz, LightBoost is turned off (automatically).  Fortunately, there’s far less motion blur with 120 Hz LightBoost than with 144 Hz non-LightBoost.
      • You need framerate matching Hz for best LightBoost benefit.
        (e.g. 100fps@100Hz or 120fps@120Hz)
      • The improved motion clarity can make tearing and stutters easier to see at higher framerates than normal. To compensate for this, upgrade your GPU for better fluidity, use a 1000Hz mouse for better fluidity, adjust game detail settings for better fluidity, and adjust VSYNC ON / OFF / Adaptive settings. In some situations, VSYNC ON (more lag) or Adaptive VSYNC (less lag) can make LightBoost motion smoother looking.
      • For answers to common questions, see the LightBoost FAQ.

CRT style gaming on LCD

LightBoost provides gaming with a CRT-like clarity, with zero motion blur — allowing complete immersion without being distracted by motion blur. Improved competitive gaming scores are possible thanks to a faster reaction time.  See improved Battlefield 3 statistics graphs.

A high end GPU is required (e.g. Geforce GTX 680780 or Titan) to frequently hit 120fps@120Hz most of the time to really notice the big improvement in motion clarity, with perfectly clear images even during fast turning and strafing. Also, it is necessary to disable the GPU artifical motion blur effects in video games, as that can ruin the LightBoost motion blur elimination. Also, some source-engine games needs their fps_max raised at the developer console, to play smooth.

For LightBoost help, feel free to ask your questions in the Blur Busters LightBoost Forum!

Supported Monitors: ASUS: VG248QE, ASUS VG278H, ASUS VG278HE,
BENQ XL2411T, BENQ XL2420T (Euro)BENQ XL2420TE (US/CAN), BENQ XL2720T
For “LightBoost” on Samsung 120Hz Monitors — see Samsung HOWTO
For “LightBoost” on G-SYNC Monitors (ULMB) — see Ultra Low Motion Blur
For “LightBoost” on 
BENQ Z-Series Monitors (Blur Reduction) — see Strobe Utility

For a complete list, see Official List of 120Hz Monitors.

468 Responses to LightBoost HOWTO

  1. Pingback: Benq XL2411T Monitor Review | Mark's Devblog

  2. BillyHill says:

    I have an Asus VG236H and a GTX560. I play the unreal series games. I usually run 120hz on the monitor with the ingame framelimit at 125. On renederers D3D9 and D3D10, frames are 120 with is enabled. The OGL renderer will still run at 125. I feel the D3d renderers run the smoothest. Vsync is off.
    Also, I have no LB in the monitor osd, it just enables a red 3d mode with this on.
    Is the above normal?

    Thanks for all the work, and I will leave this enabled.

    • Unfortunately, the VG236H does not have a strobe backlight. It is not a supported monitor for this tweak. You should trade-up if you want to get the benefit of a stroboscopic backlight to eliminate the motion blur.

      • zhabaw says:

        What about VG236HE?

        • Neither VG236H / VG236HE have a stroboscopic backlight.
          Those will not have motion clarity improvements from this HOWTO.

          • upgraded says:

            This is not a reply, cant find the comment button just reply.

            I can’t get this to work. Tried the “Unofficial Hack for LightBoost in 2D (No Glasses Emitter)” the screen just got darker, nothing else, tried everything i could find. Did a Reformate (new computer so does not matter) and tried “ToastyX — BETA INSTRUCTIONS”, easier but the same thing here, the screen just got darker, nothing else happens. Can’t see any stroboscopic effect when i wave my hand in front of the screen. The mouse etc looks just like in 60 hz. Darker screen, thats it, whats wrong?

            Got a “vg278he” screen, just spent A LOT of money on a new upscale computer, 2 monitors etc (trying this with only 1 monitor plugged in, dvi-d), got a nvidia card ofc, geforce 680. Bought everything just to try this but it wont work, just get a darker screen.

            Seems to work for everyone else /:

          • Can you download, install and test PixPerAn from Motion Tests and report back?
            Ignore the screen darkening for now (that is normal); what we need to do is run a motion test.

          • upgraded says:

            Why is there no reply button where i need it, just everywhere else :P

            “Chief Blur Buster says:
            April 17, 2013 at 5:00 pm

            Can you download, install and test PixPerAn from Motion Tests and report back?
            Ignore the screen darkening for now (that is normal); what we need to do is run a motion test.”

            I downloadet the program, looks the same with and without “lightboost” enabled. My screen is just darker, thats all. Tried both methods in this guide. The step “Go to Control Panel…
            Verify “Enable Stereoscopic 3D…” is not there on my computer.

            I have tried both methods, given up and tried again many times now. But it all looks the same, with “lightboost” my screen gets darker, thats the only difference. This is driving me crazy. Is there somthing i can try?

  3. Pingback: 120HzモニターをCRTディスプレイ並みにするLigth Boost | OnLINE MoDE

  4. zehi says:

    Hello, is there the possibility to activate light boost with the resolution 1024 * 768 in cs 1.6? or does it only works in the native resolution of the monitor?

    Cause, if I put the resolution to 1024 , the lightboost is automatically turned off.

  5. colyera says:

    Great guide. Thank you for putting this out there and doing the work. I have one question though. I have the exact same problem as this post

    “TheJackofAss says:
    January 19, 2013 at 10:57 am

    I just followed all of the steps, but I am stuck on step 7. I can not find the “Enable Stereoscopic 3D settings for all displays” box to check mark on the adjust my resolution screen. I am using Windows 7.

    I skipped this step and managed to get it working, but after restart it is no longer working any longer. Do you possibly know what I could do to solve this problem?

    I don’t see “Enable Stereoscopic 3D settings for all displays” and I suspect this to be the reason why it resets after each computer restart. I use two monitors a VG248QE and a PA248Q if that’s of any importance.

    My temporary fix that I preform after every restart:

    1. Open NVIDIA Control Panel

    2. Navigate to Stereoscopic 3D > Set up Stereoscopic 3D

    3. Enable Stereoscopic 3D > Change Stereoscopic 3D display type from Asus 120 Hz 3D LCD to 3D Vision Discover > Apply > Then change back to Asus 120 Hz 3D LCD, Apply.

    4. Fixed. And at this point I usually deselect Enable Stereoscopic 3D based off your Optional Tip as it great improves stability for me.

    Any thoughts? Thanks!

    • Multiple monitors (mixed LightBoost and non-LightBoost) can be tricky, especially if your LightBoost monitor is not the primary monitor, and it can be tricky to install the EDID override on the correct monitor.

      This might be fixable through an extra step:
      Try a Custom Resolution with a Vertical Total of 1149, either via nVidia Control Panel’s Custom Resolution feature, and/or the ToastyX Custom Resolution Utility tweak. See if LightBoost stays persistent if you tweak your vertical blanking interval bigger than its default. Check the other comments to find the ToastyX CRU.exe tip — it’s in one of the comments. Short form of instructions:

      After following full HOWTO, how to Easily re-Enable LightBoost (multi monitor) — No INF or REG files!!

      1. Download the ToastyX Custom Resolution Utility
      2. Run CRU.exe
      3. Under “Detailed Resolutions”, click “Add”
      4. Enter the numbers found in this screenshot.
      (Most important: Make sure Vertical Total is 1149)
      5. Click OK, and then reboot.
      7. LightBoost is automatically enabled when you switch to 1920×1080 at 120Hz

  6. UPDATE: See the new Easy ToastyX LightBoost Hack

    (old hack below)
    ToastyX, maker of Custom Resolution Utility, posted some new instructions, which is ready for beta testing (still requires nVidia). No registry files, no INF files, no emitters needed!:

    ToastyX — BETA INSTRUCTIONS

    For NVIDIA users, LightBoost can be enabled entirely by using Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) without installing inf or reg files.
    http://www.monitortests.com/forum/Thread-Custom-Resolution-Utility-CRU
    [Install this first]

    1. The drop-down list should have an entry for each monitor. If there are more entries and you’re not sure which ones are active, run reset-all.exe and reboot. That should leave you with an entry for each connected monitor.

    2. If you don’t have a 3D emitter, use the “Edit…” button at the very top to set the product ID to ACI27F8 for each monitor. This will make the driver think you have a VG278H with a built-in emitter so you can enable 3D mode. The model name doesn’t matter and can be set to whatever you want.

    3. Use the “Import…” button at the bottom to import this file: lightboost.bin
    I’ve included the 120/110/100 Hz LightBoost resolutions. You can remove the ones you don’t need. If you have multiple monitors, use the copy and paste buttons at the top to copy the resolutions to the other monitor entries.

    4. Click OK to save the changes, then reboot.

    5. In the NVIDIA control panel, open the “Set up stereoscopic 3D” page, then click the “Run Setup Wizard” button. If the button isn’t there, uncheck “Enable stereoscopic 3D” and click the “Apply” button.

    6. In the setup wizard, click the “Next” button, then click “Next” again. At this point, it should enable LightBoost, and if you don’t have an emitter, the mouse cursor will be very sluggish and jerky. If you don’t need to enable 3D, you can exit here. Otherwise, continue the wizard as usual.
    __

    Now LightBoost should be enabled and stay enabled as long as the monitor isn’t unplugged. If there is a power outage, you will have to run the setup wizard again. If you update the video driver, you might have to go through the process again. I might make a program to simplify the process, but I need to figure out how to enable LightBoost directly in the monitor without having to run the setup wizard manually.
    (old hack above)

    UPDATE: See the new Easy ToastyX LightBoost Hack

  7. Frederik says:

    Hello
    I have just bought a Benq xl2411t and i started to look into this whole lightboost in 2d thing.
    I have one question though. What happens if i have enabled lightboost in 2d using this “hack” and my framerates drop from say 100@100hz or 120@120hz to 80@100hz or 80@120hz? will lightboost then be temporarily disabled while im running lower than 100@100hz or 120@120hz and then turn back on when i am at the specified hz?
    The reason im asking is that i only got an overclocked gtx670 which most of the time, in most of the games i play, pumps out 120+ fps, but in certain cenarios or games do get lower than 100 fps.

    • LightBoost is always enabled; it doesn’t get automatically turned off.
      The zero-motion-blur effect just gradually reduces (and disappears) as you go down to half framerate, and comes back when you hit 120fps again. Stutters/judders indirectly cause a form of motion blur.

      It’s just like a 120 Hz CRT in that behavior; A similiar situation is fluctuating between 30fps@60Hz to 60fps@60Hz; you can easily tell whenever fps doesn’t equal Hz;

      The display-caused motion blur completely disappears on strobed displays (CRT, LighBoost) whenever you’re playing framerates matching Hz. Whatever remaining motion blur is caused by human limitation; external factors beyond your human vision (display, stutters, judders) ceases to be a motion blur limiting factor.

  8. Frederik says:

    Thanks for the Quick answer.
    So just to be clear: i am right in assuming that there is no drawbacks of having lightboost in 2d mode enabled, even though i am not always getting fps equal to hz(100@100hz or 120@120hz respectively), vs not having it enabled in 2d mode?

    • If you don’t mind the reduced color quality and brightness, and you’re not sensitive to CRT flicker, there’s no drawback. For many, the motion blur elimination outweighs a lot of disadvantages. However, if you use your monitor for graphics design and other things, you’ll probably want to turn off LightBoost whenever you exit video games.

  9. Pingback: NewEgg.com Video Mentions LightBoost 2D Zero Motion Blur | The Blur Busters

  10. Fero says:

    Hi

    Nice guide. I have done the “trick” because my new purchaced VG248QE is INSANELY bright. It helped some, but now the screen keeps tuning the light up, when something white is on the screen. (ie webbrowsing) and tun the light down when something dark is on the screen (ie the background of this site). I cant adjust the brigtness ect. on my monitor either, anymore :( :( :( :(

    How can i turn this “sh.t” off – it is driving me seriusly nuts and i am about to smash my expensive monitor! I can not get it turned off. Even with deleting the registry keys, tun off 3D, update driver, 60Hz and back to 144hz ect. ect. Even nvidia driver removal, or a system restore cant stop it. Should it realy be nessesary to format my whole computer?

    Any proposal before some one is getting a 24″ monitor ind the head, from trowing it out of the window?

    • Reformatting won’t help.

      This is caused by the “Dynamic Contrast” feature of your monitor.
      Turn off “ACSR”. (You may have accidentally turned it on)
      “ASUS Smart Contrast Ratio” should be TURNED OFF.
      If your VG248QE is stuck in dynamic contrast mode, temporarily turn off LightBoost by switching to 60 Hz refresh rate.
      Reconfigure your monitor to disable ACSR disable dynamic contrast, and then switch back to 120 Hz.

      Excessive Brightness Fix for LightBoost:
      1. To dim the LightBoost picture, lower your LightBoost setting.
      That adjusts the brightness of LightBoost. Try LightBoost=10% or LightBoost=50%. Use any setting except “OFF”.

  11. Fero says:

    Hi

    Thanks for fast response. I have accendently turned on “ECO Mode” And thats why. (doh)

    I have tried “Option B” twice now – but unfortunatly the “NVIDA LightBoost” is still “greyed out” on my screen option, so i can’t change it? The screen was extreamly bright, from right out of the box. :(

    • If your LightBoost setting is grayed out, your LightBoost is not enabled.
      You may wish to try the ToastyX method, if you successfully enabled LightBoost earlier but is having difficulty re-enabling it right now (when trying to figure out Eco Mode / ACSR).
      Hope this helps!

  12. Inous says:

    Alright I followed this to the “T” but for whatever reason when I right click the INF and hit install it says “The INF file you selected does not support this method of installation”

    Any ideas why this isnt working? I’m on Windows 7 ultimate.

    Thanks in advance!

  13. jcorp says:

    Hey, so I did everything to a T and it shows Lightboost is unlocked in my OSD menu and there’s a green light on my monitor when lightboost is on that is on now full time. But i still see mouse trailing on my desktop. Same as in 120hz i thought all mouse trailing was supposed to disappear so even tho lightboost is on is there something I need to tweak to make mouse trailing disapear? I installed the registery and all.

    Thanks!

  14. jcorp says:

    Also I’m getting mouse trailing ingame with Lightboost on… so I’m not sure if somethings wrong.

    • - Which monitor do you have? ASUS or BENQ? Which model?
      – Is it a faint mouse trail? A very sharp blur-free mouse cursor, and a very faint trailing mouse cursor?
      – If your contrast is high (90), try lowering to 65-70 and seeing if the trialing mostly disappears

  15. jcorp says:

    Benq XL2420t, the mouse trail isn’t faint its the exact same was it would be in 120hz with no lightboost on.. just there. Contrast is @ 50. It basically looks exactly like 120hz but it just dims my monitor out and changes the colors so I can’t really tell the difference with it on like I’m thinking I should? Not sure..

  16. jcorp says:

    There’s no blur when I move the mouse slowly but if I move it around in circles there’s def a trail.. I guess u would call it faint? Its lighter than the actual cursor itself but it looks exactly like 120hz.. so yea not sure.

    • This is an attribute of some LightBoost monitors; this is the crosstalk (remnant pixel persistence leaking between adjacent refreshes that are strobed). It’s much better on some LightBoost monitors, while worse on others.
      To help you tell the difference in motion blur, test some motion tests at http://www.blurbusters.com/motion-tests (e,g. PixPerAn) as well as test some games that run at full framerate (120fps at 120Hz).

      • Whitestar says:

        On Benq XL2411T I also get this faint trailing when moving the mouse cursor over certain background colors (not over white).

        I thought it was just a side effect of AMA overdrive. Anyway, it doesn’t bother me at all, and in games I see no trailing at all, just silky smooth blur-free motion. When moving mouse in in-game menus I see it, but not when moving head around in the game itself. So it’s really not an issue at all for me.

        • The faint trailing sharp ghost effect is the crosstalk leaking between LCD refreshes. It’s the 1% leftover pixel persistence after the strobe backlight has bypassed most of the pixel transitions. A properly adjusted XL2411T is pretty good.

          To see how LightBoost works, see this high-speed video. Occasionally, an extremely tiny amount (1% or less) of pixel persistence can still be visible — manifesting itself as 3D crosstalk (during 3D glasses usage) or the LightBoost trailing faint sharp ghost (a faint non-blurred ghost occuring during fast motion, during 2D usage). In normal conditions, this is not visible during video games.

          Some monitors have this worse (e.g. VG278HE) and some monitors have this better (e.g. VG248QE and XL2411T). On the VG278H (and VG278HE), this artifact is greatly reduced when using a Contrast of 65 or 75 instead of 90.

  17. acidreign says:

    Chief Blur Buster,
    Does the ToastyX utility mean I can finally get this working on XP without an emitter? The fact that it doesn’t require INF files gives me hope.
    If so, what is the easiest way to toggle Lightboost OFF if I’ve used the ToastyX method?

    Thanks.

    • I am not yet sure if the ToastyX utility works with Windows XP; why don’t you post on ToastyX’s forum to ask him?

      For toggling LightBoost off, there are multiple methods:
      — Simply switch to a different resolution (e.g. 144Hz or 60Hz)
      — Reduce the Vertical Total timing of the display mode (e.g. Vertical Total of 1120 instead of 1149). This turns off LightBoost.
      — Create a 119Hz or 121Hz refresh rate with different timings; switch to that to turn off LightBoost
      — or unplug-replug the monitor.

  18. acidreign says:

    I’ll do that!
    So if you change refresh to 144hz and then back to 120, does lightboost autostart again or does it remain off?

    Really appreciate the work you guys are doing. There is almost no information regarding this available other than you.

  19. Pingback: get the 120hz monitor u always wanted for gaming by s0dak1ng - TribalWar Forums

  20. Pingback: Removendo Motion Blur em certos LCDs | demosdorakz

  21. mikolah says:

    I have installed everything like it’s written there, used Custom Resolution Utility (CRU).
    All games works perfect, and doesn’t switch to another refresh rates. Except one game which is most important for me, it still switches to 144hz somehow, even when there is no such refresh rate in CRU list, so i can’t run the game with lightboost in fullscreen mode at all. Any idea how to prevent the game doing so?

    • Try removing the EDID extension block in ToastyX’s CRU.

      • mikolah says:

        Everything is unchecked and deleted except 3 resolutions which been added by importing lightboost.bin

        Actually i can run the game with lightboost while enabling stereo 3d in Nvidia settings, but this makes game to have much lower fps, which makes is looking much more worse then with 144hz without lightboost.

        • Strange. Which game is having the problem? Sometimes there’s an unexpected system specific problem, especially with the LightBoost tweak. One idea is to post in either the HardForum or the Overclock.net thread; there may be a user of that specific video game that has solved the problem — there is bound to be somebody else in the world who has a similiar problem with the specific game

  22. Swaggerfeld says:

    I am having some issues forcing LightBoost to remain on after disabling “Enable Stereoscopic 3D”. I have followed the full unofficial method and have LightBoost unlocked.

    Later in the guide, it states to uncheck “Enable Stereoscopic 3D” to disable, which is what mine does. Does this not conflict with the first tip listed? The first tip says that LightBoost should remain enabled when unchecked and the later tip says that LightBoost should be disabled when unchecked.

    What am I missing here? Haha.

    TIP: Improving Convenience, Stability & Eliminating “Control+T”:
    Once you’ve verified LightBoost works (Step 12), and the registry tweak was already installed (Step 4), you can make LightBoost “stick” by going to nVidia Control Panel and disabling “Enable Stereoscopic 3D” (clear the checkbox in Step 8). If the screen did not flicker when doing this, LightBoost is still enabled even after disabling 3D!
    – Games launch in 2D without needing Control+T
    – Driver stability is improved in this mode, less freezing occurs.
    – VSYNC OFF now works much more reliably, reducing input lag, fps higher than Hz.
    (Note: Some games may automatically switch resolutions; make sure it stays at 120 Hz)

    TIP: Turning Off The LightBoost Hack Without Uninstalling:
    To turn off LightBoost:
    1. Turn off the “Enable Stereoscopic 3D” checkbox in nVidia Control Panel
    2. Switch to 60 Hz mode, then switch back to 120 Hz (or 144 Hz).
    You can use a system tray utility such as MultiRes to do this more quickly.

    • What happens is that you enable stereoscopic 3D first, to trigger the lightboost (which was originally designed for 3D glasses operation), then you disable stereoscopic 3D. The installation of the EDID override and the .reg file helps force LightBoost to stay enabled, when you disable stereoscopic again after enabling it.

      You can also clear LightBoost by unplugging the power from your monitor, or by switching to 60Hz then back (or using a custom resolution with a smaller Vertical Total than 1147)

  23. scuall says:

    hi,
    Thanks for the tips i think it’s great and i use it in bf3, cs go games on my benq xl2411t.
    I ve some trouble to have lightboost on with the edit override “hacks” method, i can only use 1920*1080 or 1600*900 resolution, at 120hz ofc, to have it on.
    With the Cru utilitities i can handle all resolution that i want with lightboost on (especially 4/3 for cs go) which is great but i would be able to create 144hz resolution to turn off the lightboost when i want too, but i can’t. Maybe i do it wrong with the 144hz custom resolution(on cru) so if someone have standard settings (no lightboost) at 144hz for CRU, I would appreciate. Regards

  24. Robby says:

    Lightboost keeps disabling for me when i start the game i need it most for. I run it at 1600×900, so i presume this is the problem. I can’t find any information on your website about which resolutions this no-blur trick is supposed to run in.

    I need help in what exact parameters i need to enter in the CRU when adding 1600 x 900 as a detailed resolution.

    • Robby says:

      I just tried starting another game which runs at 1080 x 1080 120hz and lightboost was disabled for that one too, though it was re-activated again when i returned to the desktop. Any ideas why it won’t work?

    • I’ve heard it is a lot easier when you have the 3D emitter, or use the EDID override method, but as a general rule of thumb, you want a slightly inflated Vertical Total. Most people run LightBoost at 1920×1080 but I’ve heard of people running at at 1024×768 and other resolutions.

      Right now, for these unusual LightBoost resolutions, your best bet is to post in either the Overclock.net LightBoost thread or HardForum.com LightBoost thread — or have you already? Also, ToastyX runs a forum at http://www.monitortests.com/forum/Thread-Custom-Resolution-Utility-CRU — If you get the answer there, do a favour and post reply with a link back to it — so that other people can easily get the same info. Appreciated!

  25. freeze says:

    I’ve got a BENQ XL2411T, enabled Lightboost using CRU method (inf file fails to install). My mate isn’t convinced lightboost is on because the screen is still REALLY BRIGHT even with the lightboost slider on minimum (one notch above off).

    Is this just the case with this/latest monitors?

    If the monitor says lightboost is on, it’s on? :) Is it possible I’ve made a mistake along the way and it’s not on properly? Because from what I’ve heard, if lightboost is on the brightness should halve?

    Don’t get me wrong, gaming on this monitor is a dream @ 120fps, but because of the brightness it seems colours and blacks are way off, hey ho.

    • When you adjust the LightBoost setting up and down (10% through 100%), the brightness of the image changes? To confirm with you
      – LightBoost mode with LightBoost=100% is still dimmer than non-LightBoost (Brightness=100%), correct?
      – LightBoost=10% is dimmer than LightBoost=100%, correct?
      If the above two is true, LightBoost is on, and it’s still too bright?

      Another thing is that he might be referring to the gamma being bleached out rather than absolute brightness. The gamma might be bleached out a bit, try reducing Contrast to around 60 and seeing if the picture looks better for your mate.

      The other thing to do is to test LightBoost versus non-LightBoost using a motion test such as PixPerAn:
      http://www.blurbusters.com/motion-tests/
      The PixPerAn car should look much clearer in tests.

      • freeze says:

        - LightBoost mode with LightBoost=100% is still dimmer than non-LightBoost (Brightness=100%), correct?
        – LightBoost=10% is dimmer than LightBoost=100%, correct?
        If the above two is true, LightBoost is on, and it’s still too bright?

        Yes, yes and still a bit bright – getting used to it though. I disabled Lightboost and can certainly tell the difference when it’s off in PixPerAn right away!

        I can just about get used to this level of brightness. Sometimes I think I’m used to it and other times not – I’ve got a few more days to decide if I keep this monitor, but I probably will because lightboost is awesome :)

        In the end my settings are: Lightboost minimum/one notch above off. Contrast 12. NVidia settings: Gamma: Red 0.80, Green 0.81, Blue 0.91. Based on the Lagom contrast/gamma tests. If I change contrast within nvidia settings even from 50% to 47% (minimum step) the darkest colours disappear in the contrast test. I’ve got contrast 12 on my monitor so could try it at 0. At 60 the whites burn my eyes. Maybe I need sunglasses :)

        • Very interesting to hear that LightBoost=10% is too bright for you! Most people think that setting is too dim. But yes, it’s certianly working from the way you describe it, if you definitely see it producing clearer motion.

          In nVidia Control Panel, you can get intermediate steps (50, 49, 48, 47%) by clicking on the slider and then using the left/right arrow keys to adjust in tinier steps.

  26. Trollkowski says:

    I have a question, i did this today and it works pretty good, although when i activate 3d in the nvidia control panel, i go ingame, hit control + t, etc etc, it has huge input lag, so i follow the tip to just disable it again and the lightboost should stay on.

    My problem is that when i restart my pc, the lightboost setting does not show up in the OSD menu of my xl2411t, only when i active the 3d in the controlpanel, then go ingame and exit it shows up, i also noticed if i turn on the 3d my screen doesn’t flicker or do anything, except get dimmer, does this mean lightboost is only on during that time or will it stay on even after i restart my pc?

    • - Most people can’t see 120 Hz flicker directly, so that’s normal if you don’t see the stroboscopic flicker of LightBoost. It is roughly equivalent to the flicker of a 120 Hz CRT.

      – There’s an advanced step to cause LightBoost to stick better across reboots. It involves using a Custom Resolution for 120 Hz with a Vertical Total of 1149. This can be done either via nVidia Control Panel, or via the ToastyX utility (There’s some instructions elsewhere in these comments; you can also import the lightboost.bin file). This forces LightBoost to stay enabled, once enabled.

  27. ethan7000 says:

    Thanks for all your work on this. I’ve got a few questions for you.

    1. Do I need to have the Nvidia 3D driver installed? Usually I do a custom driver install and only install the regular driver.
    2. If I enable this on my XL2720T through the CRU method, how do I permanently disable it if I choose to? Can I just uninstall the CRU program? Or will removing the power plug permanently disable it until I choose to re-enable it?
    3. Do any of the install methods replace the driver that came with my monitor?
    4. Above you mention freezes with this hack enabled – is that a common occurrence?
    5. Do you think Nvidia will ever enable 2D lightboost as a standard option in their drivers?

    A lot of questions, I know. Thanks again.

    • 1. Yes, you need a 3D driver installed, at least to initialize it.
      2. Several methods, you don’t need to uninstall.
      – Switch to a resolution that doesn’t use LightBoost compatible timings (e.g. small Vertical Total — LightBoost requires 1147 and higher)
      – Switch to a non-LightBoost refresh rate
      – Delete the LightBoost-compatible 120Hz mode (from lightboost.bin) and replace with a non-LightBoost 120Hz mode in CRU
      – Uninstall CRU and use nVidia Control Panel to create a non-LightBoost 120Hz Custom Resolution (lower Vertical Total, around 1105)
      3. The ToastyX CRU method does not replace the driver of your monitor.
      4. They only happen on some systems, with some INF files. The problems are less with the ToastyX method. You can also follow the tip to keep LightBoost enabled while disabling 3D stereoscopic (see Tips section of HOWTO)
      5. Hopefully. We’ll have to see if they follow suit later this year.

  28. KurianOfBorg says:

    This is stupid. The entire image becomes pixellated and looks like it’s full of holes like Pentile Matrix.

    • You must be talking about the checkerboard pixel artifact, which only affects some models of LightBoost monitors. If you are using a VG278HE (the HE, not H), or the older XL2420T, then it suffers from amplified LCD inversion artifacts in LightBoost mode (See Lagom Inversion, and Techmind Explanation). The checkerboard artifact does not noticeably appear on newer monitors such as the BENQ XL2411T (1ms). Also, the VG278H does not suffer from this nearly as much as the VG278HE. (H is better than HE in this regards). If you are extremely sensitive to this artifact, try a different LightBoost monitor that is not afflicted by this checkerboard-pixel-pattern artifact which affect only some, but not all LightBoost monitors.

      That said, if you decide to stick with your monitor or try LightBoost again, then to make LightBoost benefits to compensate for the LightBoost disadvantages, make sure your framerate runs 120fps@120fps (or close — >80fps and preferably >100fps). LightBoost doesn’t really help 60fps@120fps. Also, when testing LightBoost, make sure to test things that LightBoost really benefits, during high speed motion operations such as:
      — Fast 180-degree flick turns in FPS shooting, great for Quake Live
      — Shooting while turning, without stopping turning (easier on CRT or LightBoost)
      — Close-up strafing, especially circle strafing, you aim better.
      — Running while looking at the ground (e.g. hunting for tiny objects quickly).
      — Identifying multiple far-away enemies or small targets, while turning fast
      — Playing fast characters such as “Scout” in Team Fortress 2
      — High-speed low passes, such as low helicoptor flybys in Battlefield 3, you aim better.

  29. Pingback: Asus/Benq/Samsung 120 Hz LightBoost TWEAK: Zero motion blur LCD; Looks like CRT!! - Page 4 - Hardware Canucks

  30. spirit says:

    I have gathered from your answers on Internet, that I have to change default vertical total to different value for turning lightboost on for 1280×720.

    Do you know that value for 1280×720 resolution? Or should I increment 1 until lightboost turns on? Or how ppl/you find out that 1149 Vertical Total is ok for fullhd?

    It just seems primitive going through hundreds of Vertical Totals to find out.

    Even some interval from-to will help.

    • The vertical total should be proportionally bigger, e.g. a ratio of 1080:1149 … (vertical resolution vs vertical total) so scaling it accordingly, would be a vertical total of 766 pixels (720 pixels plus the hidden synchronization/porch pixels). People have tried it in increments of 50. However, posting a question in the HardForum LightBoost thread would probably get a faster answer; I think I need to track down this information…

  31. mnguy69 says:

    How do I remove this? Like a complete uninstall so that nvidia recognizes my monitor as my BenQ again? I reinstalled the BenQ driver and that didn’t seem to do anything. I simply do not like the input lag and the way it removes all of the BenQ options. Anybody? Everyone seems to know how to add this but nobody knows how to remove it.

    • – I assume you’ve already followed the Tips to reduce input lag?
      — Just unplug and replug your monitor power. The LightBoost will become disabled immediately, and stay disabled if you’ve already installed your old INF file and disabled the stereoscopic checkbox.

      • mnguy69 says:

        My vsync was turned off in both cs:go and in nvidia settings, and me fps was uncapped. I normally hold over 300. This was still capping my fps at 120. I was also having issues making this work when I hooked up my second monitor that I use for non gaming.

  32. scm1610 says:

    Hi there,

    Was wondering if you could help me. I’m trying to use the “Unofficial Hack for LightBoost in 2D.” I received my BENQ XL2411T this morning and I’m using the most up to date nvidia drivers. I’ve downloaded the .INF file as shown in number 2 and double cliked to open it but when I follow the detailed instructions in number 3, I cannot find ASUS under the manufacturers list?

    Thanks

    • Instead of doubleclicking — right click the file and select “Install”.
      Also, there are sometimes different instructions for Windows Vista/7/8 so sometimes it is confusing. We’ll have better instructions; but it’s extremely hard to have the same set of instructions that work on all monitors, on all Windows versions, on all 32-bit and 64-bit systems, all with different procedures for installing.

      Another easy method is to use the ToastyX Custom Resolution Utility method — which is currently the easiest way to enable LightBoost.

  33. podonnell says:

    Many times throughout this post I see 100hz@100fps or 120hz@120fps mentioned.

    Does this mean you need to maintain a steady fps or 100 or 120 to achieve this? Or will I only be able to notice the zero motion-blur when I am maintaining between 100-120fps?

    I am running a GTX 670, so it’s a little below the recommended 680.

    Thanks!

    • You don’t necessarily need the full fps=Hz. It’s just the point of maximum LightBoost benefit. It’s a gradual improvement beginning beyond around 1/2 the refresh. So at 60fps, there’s not much benefit, but at 80fps, you see some benefit, 100fps sees clear benefit, and 120fps sees the crystal clear benefit. It’s a gradual improvement as you go beyond 60fps@120Hz towards 120fps@120Hz (VSYNC ON has maximum benefit).

      On flicker displays (CRT and LightBoost), the motion clarity amplify as you have a frame rate synchronized with the refresh rate. That’s why on CRT’s, 60fps@60Hz looks so much clearer than 30fps@60Hz. Having a lower framerate can create the impression of motion blur and/or double-image effect (repeated refresh of same frame on flicker displays).

      For users who prefer VSYNC OFF, having framerates beyond refresh rate works well as long as you can reduce/eliminate visible tearing, microstutters and harmonic stutters (e.g. stutters that occur at a beat frequency between the frame rate and refresh rate). Those interfere with LightBoost motion blur elimination benefits.

      • podonnell says:

        Aha. Yes, that makes perfect sense. I remember the CRT days where I could actually notice if a monitor was running at a lower-than-native refresh rate. If it was set to 30hz and it could run at like 80 or 90, I remember seeing that effect you mention.

        It also reminds me of the effect you would see if you recorded a CRT with a video camera. I never knew the reasoning behind that though.

      • podonnell says:

        And LightBoost is impossible at 144Hz? Is there any speculation that it might be available in the future? Would love to get those few extra frames from my monitor.

  34. podonnell says:

    I have multiple monitors, so I followed the ToastyX instructions. I can tell LightBoost definitely was working — my monitor dimmed and I had the LightBoost slider in my monitor OSD.

    However upon launching any game, I would get a horrible lag and extreme stuttering. I couldn’t even load into any game. Right at the menu screen I would see on-screen green text talking about how the game runs, and the audio I had on would be unbearable to listen to — it sounded like a drill. If I had to describe it better, this is what happens to audio when you bluescreen.

    My computer performance immediately degraded to the point where it was hard to even open task manager to kill the game process.

    What could possibly be causing that? LightBoost was definitely working, but it was causing an extreme lag. Again, the only special case I have is that I use a second monitor.

    • podonnell says:

      For the record — this might be as simple as disabling 3D. I posted in the ToastyX forum and that was the response I got.

      However, in the step-by-step instructions above, it says to ENABLE 3D. Can anyone confirm that I want to keep this box unchecked or checked?

  35. ThebombT says:

    Hi there i have a bit of a problem i followed all the steps and got lightboost to work. When i use this Tip:
    TIP: Improving Convenience, Stability & Eliminating “Control+T”:
    Once you’ve verified LightBoost works (Step 12), and the registry tweak was already installed (Step 4), you can make LightBoost “stick” by going to nVidia Control Panel and disabling “Enable Stereoscopic 3D” (clear the checkbox in Step 8). If the screen did not flicker when doing this, LightBoost is still enabled even after disabling 3D!
    – Games launch in 2D without needing Control+T
    – Driver stability is improved in this mode, less freezing occurs.
    – VSYNC OFF now works much more reliably, reducing input lag, fps higher than Hz.
    (Note: Some games may automatically switch resolutions; make sure it stays at 120 Hz)
    It works during desktop screen but whenever i seem to start a game lightboost is disabled autmatically. The dim dissapears and the lightboost in the menus is locked. I can also confirm that lightboost does indeed work i tried CS:GO and no problem at all i just had to Ctrl – T when the game luanches. When using this tip I tried all the games in my program but lightboost always turns off whenver i start anygame?? The reason i wanted to use this is because on some of my games like guild wars 2 it lags alot whenver 3d steroescope is enabled when lunching the game i can barely even type my username and password because its laging so much.

  36. podonnell says:

    Got everything up and working. Only issue is the checkerboard pixel pattern mentioned here. Since I am running the VG278HE I know that this is more prevalent in my model.

    I’ve seen mentionings of lowering the contrast, but is this done only to mask the effect? Or is that supposed to correct it? I would think there’s no way to ‘correct’ the problem, but only ways to make it less noticeable.

    It was more noticeable to me in fast action scenes. If I focused on the coin rings in a game like Sonic, I could see what looked like a distracting blur.

    Any ideas to fix this without changing my monitor would be greatly appreciated. Everything else is working great.

    Thanks!

    • Lowering the contrast actually can eliminate two-thirds or three-quarters of the intensity of the checkerboard pixel crosstalk issue that the ASUS VG278HE has. But it will still be noticeable.

      The lower contrast 65% is preferable over 90% for other reasons, in that the colors stay more colorful, and avoids more of the “gamma bleaching” effect that LightBoost otherwise produces. For example, for the game “Borderlands 2″, I have to set my VG278H to a contrast of 65% and the in-game Brightness to 5%, to get very colorful LightBoost colors. So the contrast lowering actually has a different benefit (if you can live with the slightly darker picture, or game in a light-controlled room).

      • podonnell says:

        That seems to be my biggest problem right now — the darkness. The image is so dark right now that it is causing a bit of eye strain. It doesn’t help that I sit a bit far back from this particular monitor in it’s current position.

        Anyway — I have loaded the ICC color profile and the colors do look good, but is there any way to increase the brightness at all? I have my lightboost set to the lowest setting, as I’ve read that the higher settings reduce the benefit of LightBoost.

        If possible I’d just like the screen a bit brighter. Everything else is great.

        • You should actually set LightBoost to 50% or 100%. I actually game with LightBoost at 50%. There are many other things that benefit LightBoost far more (e.g. gaming mouse for less microstutters, etc) than the difference between LightBoost=10% versus LightBoost=100%. You should not adjust LightBoost to 10% if they get eyestrain. The leap between non-LightBoost versus LightBoost is massive, while the leap between LightBoost=10% versus LightBoost=100% is relatively minor, and not worth the eyestrain benefit. Raise the LightBoost OSD percentage setting.

          60Hz is baseline
          120Hz is 50% less motion blur than 60 Hz LCD (2x less motion blur)
          120Hz LightBoost=100% is 85% less motion blur than 60 Hz LCD (7x less motion blur)
          120Hz LightBoost=50% is 89% less motion blur than 60 Hz LCD (9.5x less motion blur)
          120Hz LightBoost=10% is 92% less motion blur than 60 Hz LCD (12x less motion blur)

          But if this is a major issue and you really want to stay LightBoost=10%, I’ve heard reports that the ASUS VG248QE is about 50% brighter in LightBoost than the ASUS VG278H/HE (H being better than HE). The colors aren’t as good on the VG248QE, although the VG248QE has better motion quality than VG278H/HE.

  37. Bilco says:

    I recently was having massive instability issues playing Planetside 2 (ASUS VG248QE win8 x64, GTX Titan, WHQL 314.22 & 314.09) game would crash and then the system would be extremely sluggish resembling similar lag as if you were running the 3D wizard before hitting ctrl-T but much worse. I was able to restart but it would not be long before the crash came about again.

    Uninstalled and reinstalled the driver, tested for a few hours with out using the lightboost monitor fix and it was fine. Reinstalled the lightboost fix and the crashes came back.

    I also realized that while fullscreening certain games any flash or movie playing in VLC comes to a screaming halt FPS wise. I am wondering if possibly the lightboost stuff I installed is the culprit.

    Even though I am using the default driver for the monitor, is there any possibility this is lingering in my system and anyway to fully ‘uninstall’ the lightboost fix?

    I’d rather do this than resort to a reformat to start from ground 0 to try to determine why I can no longer play movies//flash videos while gmaing fullscreen.

    • Try these tips first:

      SOLUTION #1

      TIP: Improving Convenience, Stability & Eliminating “Control+T”:
      Once you’ve verified LightBoost works (Step 12), and the registry tweak was already installed (Step 4), you can make LightBoost “stick” by going to nVidia Control Panel and disabling “Enable Stereoscopic 3D” (clear the checkbox in Step 8). If the screen did not flicker when doing this, LightBoost is still enabled even after disabling 3D!
      – Games launch in 2D without needing Control+T
      – Driver stability is improved in this mode, less freezing occurs.
      – VSYNC OFF now works much more reliably, reducing input lag, fps higher than Hz.
      (Note: Some games may automatically switch resolutions; make sure it stays at 120 Hz)

      If that fails, make sure your problems are not being caused by graphics drivers. Did you upgrade your graphics driver when you uninstalled/reinstalled? Try the last official drivers, just to be safe. Then try:

      SOLUTION #2

      1. Reinstall graphics drivers.
      2. Instead of following these LightBoost instructions, follow the ToastyX Instrustions on enabling LightBoost.

      If that fails, the good news is that later this year, there will be a much easier way to enable LightBoost (without enabling 3D stereoscopic).

  38. Whitestar says:

    Thanks so much for this, Mark. It has revolutionized my LCD gaming! And it works just as well in 100hz as in 120hz, according to my eyes at least.

    Using ToastyX’s method I have the perfect setup now. LB is always on, and if I want to turn it off to play Skyrim (which is buggy when fps is above 85), I simply change to the 85hz profile which I made in CRU.

    The only hassle is that every time I change back to 100hz or 120hz (which activates LB again), then I have to change the desktop colors in nVidia CP. For now I’m using an AutoIt macro that does this automatically by sending key presses. But if you know a better way, then please let me know.

    Btw, I have uploaded an image of the OSD on a Benq XL2411T when LB is activated, as a reference for others: http://imageshack.us/a/img829/4835/benqxl2411tlightboost.jpg
    Feel free to use it as you like.

  39. gtjokerx says:

    Hey I’m trying to get this to work for my Asus VG248QE but I seem to be having an issue. I am getting stuck on step 3
    Install this INF file via Device Manager, then reboot.
    Detailed instructions: First, right-click this INF file in File Explorer and select “Install”. Next, go to Device Manager and right-click your monitor, select “Update Driver Software”, then “Browser my computer…”, then “Let me pick…”, then disable “Show compatible hardware”, then select the “LightBoost EDID Override” from manufacturer ASUS (even if you don’t have ASUS), and then reboot.

    When I disable the “Show compatible hardware” the manufacturer ASUS doesn’t show up. Also I do not know where to put the INF file and what to do with it exactly. I am very confused. Thanks

    • gtjokerx says:

      EDIT: I am running software NVIDIA 314.22

    • The instructions sometimes needs a variance on certain versions of Windows Vista/7/8 (x32/x64).
      But first, try this easier method instead: Follow the ToastyX Instrustions on enabling LightBoost. Let me know if this works for you!

      • gtjokerx says:

        That did work but I have another question. I have been toggling between 144hz and Lightboost and while I do see a small change in Lightboost, other than getting rid of whatever blur there is, how much of a difference does it make from the 144hz in terms of video/picture/gaming quality?

        • Whitestar says:

          There is a huge advantage: You can run the games in 100hz and there is almost no blur. Which means you only need a minimum framerate of 100, and not 144.

          The games themselves also differ with regards to how much fps they demand @100hz. Just Cause 2 doesn’t mind if the fps drops way below 100, it’s still fairly smooth. Crysis demands 100 or above, or else it gets very jerky.

          Regarding video/image quality you either just switch to a different hz than 100 or 120 and use normal colors, or you calibrate the colors with LB on. Only your own eyes can determine if the colors and brightness are good enough.

        • The moiment of minimum motion blur occurs whenever framerate exactly matches refreshrate. 100fps@100Hz or 120fps@120Hz brings out the most amazing LightBoost benefit.

          Try turning VSYNC ON for the clearest possible motion, and make sure frame rate matches refresh rate. It adds input lag, but has the minimum possible motion blur. For competitive gameplay, try VSYNC OFF with an uncapped framerate (or try various different fps_max values) or Adaptive VSYNC.

  40. dxr says:

    Hi Chief,

    I’ve got some problems…

    My actual settings are:
    Monitor: ASUS VG248QE
    GPU: nVidia Geforce GTX 560

    Seconds GPU: nVidia GT520 with a Samsung P2250 (second monitor)

    Preferred Game: CS:GO – at the moment no problem with 150+ FPS

    I have installed the inf and the registry patch.

    After that I have tried the Toasty thing….

    The 3D Settings “Verify “Enable Stereoscopic 3D settings for all displays” is enabled” are OFF and in nVidia Control Center disabled too…

    Now the problem:

    In windows (on the desktop) I HAVE lightboost enabled… According to these screenshots:
    http://i40.tinypic.com/314v803.jpg
    http://i40.tinypic.com/2z57msg.jpg

    If I change the settings, the image gets lighter/darker… For me it looks like it’s working.

    If I start CS:GO, I can’t see any real diffrence… And the LightBoost options are no longer available – But all the other options are back!

    http://i39.tinypic.com/ax0j15.jpg
    http://i39.tinypic.com/aw2us7.jpg

    ***FYI: Helligkeit = Brightness // Kontrast = Contrast (Oo) // Farbtemp. is the color temperature – It’s german.

    If I try to enable V-Sync (Triple buffer something) i’ve got MASSIVE input lag and just 60FPS. The game is locked to “fps_max 149″ and runs stable there without VSYNC.

    My next try was, to enable 3D Stereoscopic thing in Windows Settings and nVidia Controlpanel… The result was:

    10FPS in CS:GO
    MASSIVE Mouse lags (like 1-2seconds between two mouse jumps…)

    Is there any way you can help me to enable lightboost in games like CS:GO?

    Here is a photobucket album with some pictures:
    http://s1317.photobucket.com/user/doxR/library/VG248QE?sort=3&page=1

    Are the 2 monitors with diffrent setups maybe the problem?

    Greetings and thanks in advance,

    dxr

    • dxr says:

      EDIT #1

      by the way: If I enable 3D things in Windows and nVidia Settings, my browser window is BLACK. The content loads (i.e. a Youtube Video, i hear the sound) but the whole browsing area is black.

      Same for pictures.. The windows pictureviewer opens them, but they are black.

      • Try the ToastyX Method of Enabling LightBoost. This should work better. Disabling the 3D stereoscopic checkbox should solve this problem. The trick is to be able to disable stereoscopic (the cause of the black screen) while keeping LightBoost enabled (the benefit you want)

        This should make LightBoost work more reliably, with less lag.
        Let me know if this works!

        • dxr says:

          Hey Chief,

          I’ve done it the simple way – I’ve installed Win7 totally fresh :D

          Now everything works since yesterday.

          Lightboost in Games, in Windows..Everywhere.. Now I’m looking for a way to recude the brightness a little bit, cause contrast 65 with lightboost in 10-50 is a bit too bright for me, but I’ll find a way ;)

          Thanks alot for you nice tutorials!

          Greetings

          • LightBoost set to 10% is still too bright for you? Most people think that mode is too dim!

            For even reduced brightness, you may wish to re-calibrate at an even lower Contrast setting, but you’ll probably start losing color gamut (Degrading color quality). Do you have a colorimeter? If so, can you tell me how much brightness (cd/m2) you are getting at LightBoost=10%?

  41. Kert says:

    I am thinking of finding some old nvidia card that will work for lightboost enabling through the use of that hotswapping method since there’s no other way to do that with amd yet
    What’s the oldest/cheapest one that will enough for that?
    And how does hotswapping work? I mean, I’ll put 2 cards in my motherboard PCI-E slots and install drivers for both cards and then hot swap or?

    • Although definitely possible, nVidia does not sanction this (AMD is their competitor, after all!) so this is an unofficial endeavour. Blur Busters does not generally cover this in this HOWTO because we would rather not have nVidia be upset at the Blur Busters Squad.

      I have read postings on HardForum where people used the alternate ToastyX “lightboost.bin” installation method on both Geforce and Radeon, and hotplugged between them (it seemed to not matter whether the AMD and nVidia were in the same or separate systems, as long as the monitor was not disconnected from power).

  42. kdn says:

    Hi Chief,

    First of all excellent guide and comments on the above. Much appreciated for that.

    I have a little issue where I cannot disable the Stereoscopic 3D. The monitor doesn’t actually flicker and it looks like its on still. However when launching games (CSGO for example) Lightboost is disabled. I am using a BenQ XL2411T on a GTX 560Ti

    If I leave Stereoscopic 3D enabled in the nVidia CP, my game doesn’t actually start in 3D mode but lightboost is still enabled however with vsync on so my FPS is capped at 120 which I dont really want.

    I have done the basics, re-installed drivers, re-installed the fix etc etc but every result ends in the same.

    I have followed the guides, plus others to the T.

    Would it be best to try the ToastyX method? Or will it likely end in the same result? Also would I need to re-install the actual BenQ monitor driver or leave the Asus EDID installed for the ToastyX method?

    Thank you again

    • Yes, it would be best to try the ToastyX Method of Enabling LightBoost. This should work better. Disabling the 3D stereoscopic checkbox should solve this problem and let you run VSYNC OFF, uncapping your framerate. The trick is to be able to disable stereoscopic (the cause of the black screen) while keeping LightBoost enabled (the benefit you want).

      The HOWTO will be edited in the near future to also include the ToastyX method.

  43. reflexez says:

    I was able to get the “green light” on my BenQ XL2420T to signify light boost was “ON”

    I went into a game, hit cntrl + T to turn off the 3d, then I could notice there was LESS BLUR (albeit the screen was dimmer/darker, 37 contrast I believe)

    When I go into games now, the green light is OFF and I don’t see the light boosts options in the OSD so I’m pretty sure it’s not activated. But on my desktop, the green light is on for light boost; why is it turning off in games? Can someone please help me?

    *Also, I would like to add, the .INF file did NOT install the way you suggested on this website. I have Windows 7 64bit and I could NOT “right click” the file and install. I got a “system error”. I had to go to device manager>monitors>update driver software>browse computer>let me pick>I Have disk. From there, it detected the .INF file and I was able to install. Hope this helps other people.

    • LightBoost sometimes deactivates itself in games, because the game wants to switch to a different resolution or refresh rate. Make sure the game is switched to 1920×1080 at 100Hz or 120Hz. You can also use lower resolutions, though it may require some tweaking with nVidia Control Panel (Custom Resolutions) and/or ToastyX utility to create these extra modes.

      The ToastyX method will also install the correct LightBoost-compatible 100Hz and 120Hz mode — this should simplify things.

  44. reflexez says:

    I also do NOT know what windows version the user who created this tutorial was following, but there is NO step 7 in the control panel under display>adjust resolution.

    “6. Go to Control Panel -> Display -> Adjust Resolution

    7. Verify “Enable Stereoscopic 3D settings for all displays” is enabled”

  45. reflexez says:

    Thank you for your replies.

    1 more question:

    Is there supposed to be “mouse trail” when on the windows 7 desktop (64bit)?

    the green light boost light is online on my benq xl2420T and it looks great in games, but I still see mouse trail on the windows 7 desktop

    • Some LightBoost monitors, including the VG278HE (‘HE’ more prone than ‘H’) and XL2420T, have slightly more visible pixel transitions leaking between refreshes (shows up as 3D crosstalk). During fast motions (like moving mouse cursor fast) you will get a trailing faint ultra-sharp ghost (non-blurred faint ghost double-image) roughly the same intensity as that own monitor’s 3D crosstalk. The better the monitor’s ability to eliminate 3D crosstalk, the better the monitor’s LightBoost motion is. Also, mouse cursor are often black/white, going over white windows, which amplifies the visibility of this. You can reduce the intensity of this by reducing contrast, but this can affect color. The BENQ XL2411T is better at this, with almost no visible trailing ghost, but the colors are worse than the XL2420T.

      If this is not currently bothering you, you can ignore this. If LightBoost artifacts at Windows Desktop bother you, simply turn off LightBoost at desktop (e.g. by creating a non-LightBoost refresh rate in ToastyX Custom Resolution Utility, such as 119Hz non-LightBoost versus 120Hz LightBoost).

  46. madrid says:

    Hi , ToastyX BETA INSTRUCTIONS work great for me,i got 120hz lighboost ON in 2 min with my BENQ XL2411T , problem is i cant get back to 144hz, can you post the custom resolution setting in cru.exe for 144hz?

    iput this but not work
    http://oi42.tinypic.com/2zxpks0.jpg

    • For 144Hz, you need to use “Reduced”, instead of Manual. This makes the blanking intervals and porches much smaller, to give you enough bandwidth for 144Hz. (Reduced is also the reason why 144Hz is not compatible with LightBoost)

      Once you’ve added 144Hz Reduced, you can turn on/off LightBoost simply by convenientily switching between 120Hz (LB) and 144Hz (non-LB).

      • madrid says:

        Thank, now i got 144 , and 120 lightboost , without having to reset all settings. WORK perfect with BENQ XL2411T

      • madrid says:

        I have a question is normal when you move your mouse in desktop you can see some kind of shadow following the pointer it? lightboost ON and lightboost off still got that shadow following the pointer when i move it fast….

  47. reflexez says:

    Thanks the fast amazing replies Chief Blur Buster.

    As to clarify in the article, do you recommend 65 contrast on the BenQ models for contrast? I know you stated in the above article that as soon as light boost is activated, the monitor will become dimmer and contrast can be increased but you recommended 65.

    My BenQ XL2420T defaulted to lightboost on 100 via the on-screen display and contrast was at 37.

    I moved it up to 65 as you suggested, but the blacks do seem a bit too dark and the whites seem a bit too “bright”. Is this a subjective setting or do you truly recommend it?

    I tried to read your article regarding the nVidia color management options to improve color quality but it seemed written/geared towards the Asus monitors and I’m not sure it was written regarding the BenQ models, since you recommend 90 contrast for the Asus monitors and I couldn’t even imagine how odd that would look on my BenQ, considering 65 is VERY BRIGHT/TOO DARK.

    Thank you thus far for your help and hopefully these comments help other users.

    • These aren’t hard-and-fast numbers, as you can adjust it to suit your visual preferences.
      Just make sure you go to Lagom LCD Test Patterns and check the Contrast pattern and the Black Level pattern.

      If you raise your contrast level, you get a gamma bleaching effect where colors are washed out. However, there’s an advantage to raising the contrast level — you get more of the color gamut of the monitor if you use a calibration tool such as Spyder4 or i1 Pro. TFTCentral was able to get almost 700:1 contrast ratio in LightBoost at a Contrast of 75%, and it should be possible to get at least 800:1 contrast ratio in LightBoost at a Contrast of 90%. The chief problem is the colors becoming washed out, and there is more LightBoost crosstalk which also affects 2D usage (trailing faint sharp ghost effect — e.g. trailing mouse cursor when you move mouse cursor around).

      However, if that’s not a problem, go ahead and raise Contrast, if a brighter picture is much more important. You still keep the motion blur elimination benefits. :-)

  48. madrid says:

    I have a question is normal when you move your mouse in desktop you can see some kind of shadow following the pointer it? lightboost ON and lightboost off still got that shadow following the pointer when i move it fast….

    • Whitestar says:

      Yes, on some background colors you will see a shadow if you look closely for it. Also in some game menus you will notice this. Does in no way affect the game itself though, so for me it is a very minor issue. I only see the shadow if I look closely for it, and it’s only on the mouse.

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