G-SYNC 101: G-SYNC Ceiling vs. FPS Limit


How Low Should You Go?

Blur Busters was the world’s first site to test G-SYNC in Preview of NVIDIA G-SYNC, Part #1 (Fluidity) using an ASUS VG248QE pre-installed with a G-SYNC upgrade kit. At the time, the consensus was limiting the fps from 135 to 138 at 144Hz was enough to avoid V-SYNC-level input lag.

However, much has changed since the first G-SYNC upgrade kit was released; the Minimum Refresh Range wasn’t in place, the V-SYNC toggle had yet to be exposed, G-SYNC did not support borderless or windowed mode, and there was even a small performance penalty on the Kepler architecture at the time (Maxwell and later corrected this).

My own testing in my Blur Busters Forum thread found that just 2 FPS below the refresh rate was enough to avoid the G-SYNC ceiling. However, now armed with improved testing methods and equipment, is this still the case, and does the required FPS limit change depending on the refresh rate?

Blur Buster's G-SYNC 101: Input Latency & Optimal Settings
Blur Buster's G-SYNC 101: Input Latency & Optimal Settings
Blur Buster's G-SYNC 101: Input Latency & Optimal Settings
Blur Buster's G-SYNC 101: Input Latency & Optimal Settings
Blur Buster's G-SYNC 101: Input Latency & Optimal Settings
Blur Buster's G-SYNC 101: Input Latency & Optimal Settings

As the results show, just 2 FPS below the refresh rate is indeed still enough to avoid the G-SYNC ceiling and prevent V-SYNC-level input lag, and this number does not change, regardless of the maximum refresh rate in use.

To leave no stone unturned, an “at” FPS, -1 FPS, -2 FPS, and finally -10 FPS limit was tested to prove that even far below -2 FPS, no real improvements can be had. In fact, limiting the FPS lower than needed can actually slightly increase input lag, especially at lower refresh rates, since frametimes quickly become higher, and thus frame delivery becomes slower due to the decrease in sustained framerates.

As for the “perfect” number, going by the results, and taking into consideration variances in accuracy from FPS limiter to FPS limiter, along with differences in performance from system to system, a -3 FPS limit is the safest bet, and is my new recommendation. A lower FPS limit, at least for the purpose of avoiding the G-SYNC ceiling, will simply rob frames.



220 Comments For “G-SYNC 101”

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gen36
Member
gen36

Hi, I have a question about limiting frame rate at (refresh rate – 3).

My understanding is that if FPS > refresh rate, GSYNC defaults to VSYNC behavior (if VSYNC is enabled in Nvidia CP), which can result in additional input lag.

But I have some confusion on this. Example scenario:

– 144 Hz monitor.
– I’m playing an undemanding game, VSYNC OFF, and get 200 FPS.
– I turn on GSYNC + VSYNC, and get 144 FPS.
– With GSYNC + VSYNC on, is it defaulting to VSYNC ON behavior? Frame rate is not exceeding refresh rate but *would have* if vsync was off.

(My confusion is coming from the section in the FAQ saying if your frame rate exceeds refresh rate, to cap at a value lower than refresh rate, but if vsync is on, FPS doesn’t exceed refresh rate anyway)

Silver3
Member
Silver3

I was wondering if you could explain me a very persistent Frametime-Spiking-relating issue I’ve got recently with the console-emulator Cemu that I am tearing my hair out about at this time.

[… original comment modified here for length; view below comment reply for pertinent details w/follow-up…]

Sorry btw for that wall of text, but I am quite at my wit’s end by now on my way comprehending other/similar builds’ success although they probably don’t care half of that, pc-related, the way I do and I seemingly checked all of your mentioned points possibly causing frametime-spikes
and will continue with the hardware-part tomorrow.
If you have any suggestion that merely could hint in a direction I overlooked, PLEASE let me know.

Thank you for reading.

Skwuruhl
Member
Skwuruhl

On the topic of FPS limiters: Two tests have been done somewhat recently that found that RTSS provides more consistent frame times than in-game limiters do (at the expense of 1 frame of input lag)
https://youtu.be/xsXFUVYPIx4
https://www.reddit.com/r/Competitiveoverwatch/comments/9vcxz5/rtss_vs_ingame_fps_cap_or_frame_limit/
What’s your take on these?

rpate124
Member
rpate124

What value should the frame time limit be set to in rtss?

GITS_2501
Member
GITS_2501

Amazingly detailed, thanks for the guide. Is there a difference between having V-SYNC: ON versus VSYNC: Fast?

Thanks heaps.

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